Ahmedabad is the most populous city in the Indian state of Gujarat.
Ahmedabad is located near the banks of the Sabarmati River, 25 km , from the capital of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, also known as its twin city.
Ahmedabad has emerged as an important economic and industrial hub in India. It is the second-largest producer of cotton in India, due to which it was known as the ‘Manchester of India’ along with Kanpur.

In 2010, Ahmedabad was ranked third in Forbes’s list of fastest growing cities of the decade. In 2012, The Times of India chose Ahmedabad as India’s best city to live in. The gross domestic product of Ahmedabad metro was estimated at $80 billion in 2020.In 2020, Ahmedabad was ranked as the third-best city in India to live by the Ease of Living Index.

In the 19th century, Cawnpore was an important British garrison with barracks for 7,000 soldiers. During the Indian Rebellion of 1857, 900 British men, women and children were besieged in the fortifications for 22 days by rebels under Nana Sahib Peshwa. They surrendered on the agreement that they would get safe passage to the nearby Satti Chaura Ghat whereupon they would board barges and be allowed to go by river to Allahabad.
Though controversy surrounds what exactly happened at the Satti Chaura Ghat, and who fired the first shot, it is known that, soon afterwards, the departing British were shot at by the rebel sepoys and were either killed or captured. Some of the British officers later claimed that the rebels had, on purpose, placed the boats as high in the mud as possible, to cause delay. They also claimed that Nana Sahib’s camp had previously arranged for the rebels to fire upon and kill all the English. Although the East India Company later accused Nana Sahib of betrayal and murder of innocent people, no evidence has ever been found to prove that Nana Sahib had pre-planned or ordered the massacre. Some historians believe that the Satti Chaura Ghat massacre was the result of confusion, and not of any plan implemented by Nana Sahib and his associates. Lieutenant Mowbray Thomson, one of the four male survivors of the massacre, believed that the rank-and-file sepoys who spoke to him did not know of the killing to come.[17]
Many were killed and the remaining 200 British women and children were brought back to shore and sent to a building called the Bibighar (the ladies’ home). After some time, the commanders of the rebels decided to kill their hostages. The rebel soldiers refused to carry out orders and butchers from the nearby town were brought in to kill the hostages three days before the British entered the city on 18 July. The dismembered bodies were thrown into a deep well nearby. The British under General Neill retook the city and committed a series of retaliations against the rebel Sepoys and those civilians caught in the area, including women, children and old men. The Cawnpore Massacre, as well as similar events elsewhere, were seen by the British as justification for unrestrained vengeance. “Remember Cawnpore” became a war cry for British for the rest of the rebellion.

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